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Dead zones have increased more than 10-fold since 1950, according to a paper published in January by an international group of scientists for the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. Last year, the Gulf of Mexico dead zone was the largest ever measured—about the size of New Jersey. As global temperatures continue to rise, dead zones in the world’s oceans, as well as in major U.S. waterways like the Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay, are only expected to grow.

a close up of a map: Low-oxygen zones are spreading around the globe. Red dots mark places on the coast where oxygen has plummeted to 2 milligrams per liter or less, and blue areas mark zones with the same low-oxygen levels in the open ocean.© Provided by The Daily Beast Low-oxygen zones are spreading around the globe. Red dots mark places on the coast where oxygen has plummeted to 2 milligrams per liter or less, and blue areas mark zones with the same low-oxygen levels in the…

Credit: GO2NE Working Group; Data From World Ocean Atlas 2013 and Provided by R.J. Diaz

Continue reading:  America’s Coastlines Are Turning Into ‘Dead Zones’

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