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The world’s oceans are turning acidic at what’s likely the fastest pace in 300 million years. Scientists tend to think this is a troubling development. But just how worried should we be, exactly?

(Reuters)

It’s a question marine experts have been racing to get a handle on in recent years. Here’s what they do know: As humans keep burning fossil fuels, the oceans are absorbing more and more carbon-dioxide. That staves off (some) global warming, but it also makes the seas more acidic — acidity levels have risen 30 percent since the Industrial Revolution.

There’s reason for alarm here: Studies have found that acidifying seawater can chew away at coral reefs and kill oysters by making it harder to form protective shells. The process can also interfere with the food supply for key species like Alaska’s salmon.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/08/31/the-oceans-are-acidifying-at-the-fastest-rate-in-300-million-years-how-worried-should-we-be/

Commentary by The Secular Jurist:  This article presents a rather conservative look at the potential economic costs associated with ocean acidification.  We fear the actual costs will be much worse.  Although, any information that allows the public to see how climate change will directly impact their lives is appreciated.